Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender Historical Society
Info: 415.777.5455, www.glbthistory.org
Location: GLBT Historical Society, 973 Market St., Suite 400 (@ 6th St)

Moments in Time From the 20th Century: The Photographs of Virginia Benavidez
Tuesday-Saturday, June 8-August 31; 2-5 pm
Opening Reception: Friday, June 8, 6-9 pm
Free
The Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender Historical Society of Northern California is proud to present the photography of Virginia Benavidez. The images in this exhibit include: portraits of friends and people in her life; Native-American Pow Wows; women of color; and images of the Bay Area’s Latina/o and queer communities. Benavidez’s work vibrates with light, action, and power; moments in time captured on film. The diversity of work in the exhibit reflects Benavidez’s own identity as a lesbian of mixed-blood ancestry.

benavidezduo

Roundtable: Mixed-Blood: Multiracial identity in the Queer Community
Sunday, June 10, 2-4 pm

Roundtable: Visual Artists in Queer People of Color Communities
Sunday, July 15, 2-4 pm

Roundtable: Writers in Queer People Of Color Communities
Sunday, August 5, 2-4 pm

Queer History Exhibit
GLBT Historical Society
Location: Yerba Buena Performing Arts Center, Lobby, 701 Mission @ 3rd St
Thursday, May 31-Friday, June 22
Weekdays, one hour before 8 pm performance;
Weekends, 1-5 pm

Civic Center Pride Celebration Site, June 23, noon-5p.m.; June 24, 9 am -5 pm

The Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender Historical Society (GLBTHS) presents “Making a Case for Community History,” a pioneering collaboration of community curators and historical and museum professionals. The cases are a “mobile museum,” promoting queer history at the grassroots level. Participating groups receive exposure to professional historical preservation. They also interact with museum professionals who walk the groups through the entire process of staging a large-scale exhibition. In the past two years, featured groups included the African-American, Asian-Pacific Islander, Latino/a, and Native American communities. Other cases were curated by lesbian feminists, the leather/fetish/SM community, transgender/transsexual people, bisexual people, sex workers, GLBT elderly, the Sisters of Perpetual Indulgence, the Imperial Court System, and the Bears of San Francisco. Among this year’s groups are Metropolitan Community Church of SF and the Tavern Guild of SF. “Making a Case for Community History” is less an end-product than a powerful starting place. Each group and its history not only receives the wide exposure it deserves, but the individuals involved are given the professional tools needed to keep their own history in their own hands and to tell its story with their own voices.